Pausanias

Library of Hadrian

The most monumental building dedicated to education and intellectual pursuits in Athens was the so-called Library of Hadrian (Fig. 1). It consisted of four columned halls with exedrae at regular intervals on the north and south sides, and a library room flanked by lecture halls on the east. In the ...

Sanctuary of Artemis

The Greeks in Homer’s Iliad sacrificed to Artemis at Aulis in Boeotia in the hopes of favorable winds to carry them from Greek shores to Troy (Il. 2.305-310). The late 5th century Athenian playwright, Euripides, made reference to the grove of Artemis in his Iphigenia in Aulis (185-186, 1543-1549). ...

Sanctuary of Hyernetho

According to local legend, the Argive maiden, Hyrnetho, died in an ancestral struggle and was buried on this site (Pausanias, 2.28.6-7). The sanctuary lay in the midst of a grove of wild olive trees. Established law, even in Roman times, forbade anyone to remove broken branches of these olives or a...

Sanctuary of Poseidon

We know of a grove of trees in the precinct of the temple of Poseidon, thanks to Pausanias’ and Strabo’s descriptions of it in the early 1st and the later 2nd century A.D. (Strab. 8.6.22; Paus. 2.1.7). According to Pausanias, on one side of the precinct stood statues of athletes who had been victor...